Lighting Design & Specification

Adaptive Lighting Systems Occupancy SensingOne of the major benefits delivered by a smart lighting system is its ability to provide enormous energy savings. This can be achieved by granting luminaires a certain degree of autonomy. While it might seem that the occupants of a given space know best how and when this space should be lit, a well-tuned smart lighting system can be far more efficient than the one which relies solely on human-made decisions.

In order to enable a lighting system to make autonomous decisions with regard to its light output and operation, it must be provided with a stream of information upon which such decisions can be made. A big part of those data comes from sensors. A sensor-driven network of smart bulbs is capable of tracking changes in the environment and interpreting these changes in order to dynamically adjust its operation for optimal comfort and energy efficiency, as well as lower electricity bills. This might sound a bit complicated, but the individual lighting control techniques employed by smart lighting systems are quite simple. Let us break them down for you, starting with occupancy sensing.

Occupancy sensing is one of the most common lighting control methods used in today’s buildings. Simply put, it allows for dimming or turning off lights automatically after a given space has been vacant for a certain user-specified period of time. Once movement is detected, lights turn back on or dim up as desired. The movement detection part is handled by motion sensors employing infrared, ultrasonic or microwave sensing technology. The number of sensors that should be deployed in a given space to provide the lighting system with a sufficient input depends both on the size and type of space, as well as on the desired lighting performance. A simpler scenario involves all bulbs operating synchronously and providing an equal level of light intensity across the entire space as long as an occupant is present in the field of view of any of the wall-mounted sensors. A bit more complicated setup, which also enables more efficient performance, is the one where the space is divided into a number of separate lighting zones, each assigned to one or more sensors. Whenever movement is detected in one of the zones, only this particular zone lights up. Such an arrangement is particularly useful in larger open spaces, staircases or long corridors. The picture above can give you an idea of how this works.

If you take a look at the room on the right, you’ll notice that only its small part is brightened up. This is because the person entering the room is only walking through it to get somewhere else — so there is no need for all of the lights to be turned on. Only the luminaires that are relevant in this situation have triggered, and once the man leaves the room, the entire space will become dark again. If a sensor-driven lighting system wasn’t installed in such an interconnecting room, the entire space would most likely stay fully lit up all day, every day. But that’s not the peak of energy savings that can be delivered via occupancy sensing in an office environment.

The most sophisticated scenario, promising the most efficient energy management, is the one where occupancy sensors are integrated directly into lighting fixtures. This allows each fixture to respond autonomously to occupancy signals from a sensor installed in it. Such a setup is ideally suited to office spaces or certain types of manufacturing plants, since it treats each workstation as a separate zone that will only brighten up when an employee is present.

Occupancy sensing is a proven strategy to sharply reduce lighting energy consumption, and for this reason it is often mandated by commercial building energy codes. Potential savings it offers vary significantly among different types of spaces, with the biggest benefits to be obtained in the ones that are intermittently occupied, such as classrooms or offices. However, the total lighting load reduction of approximately 20-30% can be achieved this way in the majority of commercial environments.

The concept behind occupancy sensing is pretty much the same in the case of both wired and wireless lighting control systems. What wireless solutions bring to the table is the unmatched flexibility in installing such an adaptive, sensor-driven lighting system. A dense network of wall-mounted wireless occupancy sensors covering the entire office building can be installed virtually overnight, while installing a similar network of wired sensors would require laying down miles of cables, and perhaps even ripping the walls open in order to hide them beneath the surface. And if you choose Bluetooth Smart as the wireless connectivity enabler for your smart lighting network, you can forget about frequent battery replacement. With the protocol’s support for sleepy nodes — devices that spend most of their time in sleep mode, wake up only to quickly perform their task, and then go back to sleep — such simple smart devices can keep running on tiny coin cells for years.

Wireless technologies provide outstanding flexibility also with regard to the ongoing maintenance of an adaptive lighting system. In order to maximize its efficiency and adjust its performance to occupants’ needs and new regulations, the system can and should be manually tuned over time. This relates to such settings as the desired level of light or the amount of time between last detected occupancy and the lights switching or dimming. In a smart lighting system, they can be modified in a couple of seconds just by using a smartphone app. There is no need to arrange a visit of a building management system specialist. Everything is plug-and-play.

Occupancy sensing can be combined with other lighting control strategies in order to maximize savings and address sustainability even better. For example, adding photo cells into the mix allows for detecting the ambient light level. If it exceeds the user-specified value, lights won’t turn on even if occupancy is detected in a given space. Ambient light sensors also enable another advanced lighting control strategy which by itself is capable of delivering significant savings – daylight harvesting. But that’s the subject of another article.

Read Part 2 - Adaptive Lighting Systems: Daylight Harvesting.


 

This article first appeared as a Silvair blog post. Silvair’s team of software developers, hardware engineers, UX designers, product managers and testers are building a growing network of products that are truly smart and user friendly: https://www.silvair.com.

Retrofit it Your Way with Visioneering’s LRK-TRH

Changing Scene

  • Prev
Stanpro (Standard Products Inc.) announced the start of its 60th anniversary celebrations. ...
The third edition of UL 8802, Outline of Investigation for Germicidal Systems, introduces a new ...
Effective August 1st, 2021, Resilient Sales Corp, led by its Principal Sean Atkinson, will serve as ...
GE Current’s all-new Daintree Controls software platform allows users to manage building portfolios ...
Acuity Brands, Inc. has announced its Care222® filtered far-UVC module with patent-pending ...
Please join Liteline Corporation in welcoming a new addition to their United States team!
 Leviton Canada have announced that the company has been certified as a Great Place to Work® ...
LEDVANCE, the makers of SYLVANIA general lighting in the United States and Canada, recently ...
Skyview Capital, a global private investment firm, announced that it has acquired the Digital ...
This week, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) announced its 2021 Society Awards for ...

Changing Scene

 

Messe FrankfurtSince 2002, the Luminale festival in the German cities of Frankfurt and Offenbach has accompanied Light + Building, the world's leading trade fair for light and building services technology, which takes place every two years in Frankfurt am Main. Initiated by Messe Frankfurt as a "bridge from the exhibition grounds to the city", the public event has since developed into an internationally recognised light and culture festival with over 250,000 visitors.


Messe Frankfurt as the organiser holds all trademarks and funds the project office, the promotion of Luminale and a beacon project. Due to Messe Frankfurt's economic situation, this is not viable for 2022. Therefore, the will not take place in 2022. 

Read More


 

Design

  • Prev
Legrand announced the publication of research showing its Indigo Clean® light disinfection ...
Whitecap Dakota First Nation has created a destination resort like no other in Saskatchewan ...
The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering ...
Originally designed by Quebec architects Rogers D’Astous and Jean-Paul Pothier in 1967 at the time ...
One of the integral elements that contributes to authentic design is values–knowing what ...
A combination of stunning design, a spectacular desert setting, and exceptional architectural ...
The Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC) represents over 60,000 public ...
The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recently published ANSI/IES LP-12-21, IoT Connected ...
For an architect, a building is a work of art. But while that art looks great during the day, how ...
“Authentic design” is an important concept that we value at LightForm. Well, of course we do: we ...

LED Technology

  • Prev
Scientists at the Circadian Light Research Center have identified the narrow band of blue light ...
Unless you’ve been living on a deserted South Pacific island prior to March 2020, you know that ...
This summer EiKO is launching its Z10 product offering. I know, what is Z10 other than the sports ...
A new report by the IEA 4E Solid State Lighting Annex provides a look across the body of literature ...
While “circadian lighting” varies in definition, it generally refers to design that uses intensity ...
Heliospectra announced the release of two new guides with focus on energy-savings, incentives, and ...
The lighting controls market, anecdotally, is a significant growth segment within the lighting ...

New Products

  • Prev
The eLumigen High CRI C1D2 LED Fixture is the ideal light source replacement for Paint Booth, ...
The eLumigen LED Linear Vapor Tight fixtures are designed for installation at mounting heights of ...
Introducing the new in-sourced, upgraded, and expanded vapor tight LED High Bay -- the ...
These new controllers offer indoor or outdoor ON/OFF, photocell, dimming, scene and color tuning ...
LEDVANCE, the makers of SYLVANIA general lighting in the United States and Canada, has released the ...
EiKO's Z10 intelligent sensor fixture comes with wireless controls and many more features.  
Stanpro’s L2WMG is a LED linkable wrap that is perfectly suited for utility rooms, corridors, ...
Visioneering’s new Bevel features a contemporary design that provides subtle architectural flair to ...
Lumenwerx announces Pivot, a next-level architectural 48V Magnetic Track System with integral ...
Luminis has released its Scena family of exterior luminaires. The elegant surface mount fixtures ...
Kerrwil Publications Great Place to Work. Certified December 2019 - December 2020

538 Elizabeth Street, Midland,Ontario, Canada L4R2A3 +1 705 527 7666
©2021 All rights reserved

Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Privacy Policy (effective 1.1.2016)
The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Kerrwil